Sick Trx Singles is a great way to practice doubles with only two people. We play this instead of half-court singles because it takes the handicap out of half-court singles. Sometimes people tape off part of the court or don’t allow around-the-post shots. 

Here’s how it works: Each player stays on the same side of the court that their score dictates. If I’m even, I’ll be on the right side of the court; if I’m odd, I’ll be on the left side of the court. My opponent does the same and, therefore, we get all four angles in one game.

The other difference is that around-the-post shots are legal and don’t have to land in the square you’re in. Sick Trx Singles 100 percent mimics doubles—with just two people—so you can get a great workout in a short amount of time. 

  • Instagram
  • Facebook
  • Twitter

Share:

Chalk it Up - How to Mark Courts

As pickleball explodes across the country and around the world, players are finding new and creative places to play. In cooler climates, players are utilizing basketball, tennis, and volleyball courts—lining them for pickleball. In warmer climates, outdoor basketball and tennis courts are being lined or repurposed for pickleball.

One of the most common questions we’re asked is, “How many pickleball courts can fit onto a standard basketball or tennis court?”

The answer depends on how much space you want to have between courts—for a waiting area or a shaded rest space for players—or how intrusive you want pickleball lines to be on multi-purpose courts. Lining multi-purpose courts.

Lining multi-purpose courts for pickleball
Keep in mind that more pickleball courts equal more lines. On a standard tennis court, two pickleball courts can easily be added without greatly interfering with the line structure of the tennis court [Diagram #1]. It’s possible to have as many as four pickleball courts on a tennis court, however, the space will be packed with minimal room between courts [Diagram #2].

Tennis courts often come in pairs, so we’ve included the optimal layout using a (6) pickleball to (2) tennis court lining [Diagram #3]. Repurposing tennis courts—lining courts specifically dedicated to pickleball.

While a standard two-court tennis facility can accommodate up to eight lined pickleball courts, it’s more comfortable to replace the tennis pair with six pickleball courts. The “6 on 2” option (Diagram #3) is ideal, as it allows ample space for a rest/waiting area. Don’t underestimate the need for a shaded rest area at courtside.

How to install lines
Here’s what you’ll need for both temporary and permanent lines.

Temporary Lines
• Two sets of hands, although it’s possible to line courts by yourself.
• 200 feet of Green Frog Tape per court (for temporary lines)
• Two, 25-foot tape measures
• Chalk or pencil marker

Permanent Lines
• 1 to 2 days of sunshine
• Two sets of hands, although it’s possible to line courts by yourself.
• 400 feet of Green Frog Tape per court (to create line stencils)
• Line Paint
• Brush, drop cloth, painting materials
• Two, 25-foot tape measures
• Chalk or pencil marker

When lining a multi-purpose court, it’s always easier to work from the court’s existing lines. For example, when working on a tennis court, use the tennis service line as a line marker for the non-volley zone line (see diagrams #1, #2 and #3). Of course, if you’re working from a blank slate, you won’t have lines to use as a guide.

Each new court will require a minimum of 198 feet of tape. While many people line courts will blue painter’s tape, we recommend green Frog Tape because it adheres better to the court and doesn’t leave residue when removed. Also, green Frog Tape doesn’t interfere with white tennis court lines; pickleball players quickly become accustomed to recognizing the green lines—the white lines will become invisible—vice versa for tennis players. Yellow Frog Tape and blue painter’s tape tend to disengage from the courts quicker. Do not use duck tape under any circumstance, as it’s very expensive and can ruin the surface beneath when removed.

Screen Shot 2020-04-22 at 2.47.09 PM.png
"The Official Magazine of Pickleball"- USAPA

Pickleball Magazine has never been more illustrated: intensity, passion, meaning, insights, tournaments, products. Pickleball Magazine covers it all and goes out to over 100K readers every issue.

Pickleball Magazine 
11 Mayview Road
Canonsburg, PA 15317